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The Ultimate Guide to MMA, MMA News and MMA Fighting (An Easy How-To Guide)

 

Mixed Martial Arts is one of the greatest sports in entertainment history. It is a combat sport that allows full combat and allows both grappling and striking when on feet and when on the ground.

The techniques used are similar to those from martial arts and other combat sports. The thrill and the media exposure has seen the sport grow and made known to many across the globe. While the media exposure and the money have come to influence the sport greatly just recently, the history of the sport is quite deep and dates many years back.

What Is Mixed Martial Arts / MMA?

Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) is a full-contact combat sport that allows grappling as well as striking, whether standing or on the ground, and allows for techniques from other combat sports and martial arts.

Origin of MMA

The first ever documented use of the term mixed martial arts was actually in a review of UFC 1 by Howard Rosenberg, a tv critic, in 1993. The website newfullcontact.com, one of the largest websites covering the sport at the time, helped with its popularity after it hosted and published the article.

The official question of who coined the term is up for debate still.

In 1980, CV Productions, Inc. created the first regulated MMA league within the United States, naming it Tough Guy Contest, later to be named Battle of the Superfighters.

10 tournaments were sanctioned in Pennsylvania, but in 1983, the Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill prohibiting the sport.

Good news for fight fans, the Gracie family brought vale tudo, which was developed in  Brazil in the 1920s to the US by founding what we now know as the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) MMA promotion company.

 

Origin of the Ultimate Fighting Challenge

Martial arts is nothing new to the world. Before the era of modern weaponry, all the successful Western and Eastern cultures had their own form of martial arts in order to survive and defend their territories. Most developed combat sports as a means of entertainment and, also, to help keep their warriors in shape for war. Evidence of mixed martial arts’ existence in the early ages has been found in Egypt, the Philippines, Brazil, Greece, Thailand, Japan, and in the United States.

The Ultimate Fighting Challenge, however, dates back to the 1970s – about two decades before the premier of the UFC’s first edition on the 12th of November 1993 where Royce Gracie shocked the whole world. Gracie family was well-known in Brazil thanks to their Carlson, Helio, and Carlos fights. Looking to expand their knowledge and conquer another wider market, Rorion Gracie opted to move to spread their roots to the United States.

The journey was nothing but a challenge. But Rorion did not forget his ultimate desire. He set up a jiu-jitsu mat in his garage and spent 10 years in that garage teaching jiu-jitsu. After the 10 years, he had an awakening and realized he had to introduce jiu-jitsu to the world. That is when the idea of a tournament struck him. The tournament was to feature martial arts fighters, and the aim was to see who would become the best.

The challenge now was coming up with something spectacular that would be widely embraced in the new territory. After coming up with crazy ideas of how to create an arena where the fighters would not escape (like putting and electric fence around the ring or building a tank full or alligators or sharks around the ring), he together with the movie director and writer, John Milius settled on the octagon idea.

Colorado was the most fertile field to plant the UFC seed. There, fighters could fight without gloves or rules. The UFC 1 was to be held there. His choice for Royce Gracie did not come easy given that he was a tiny, skinny, and inexperienced among fighters in their clan. He defied people’s advice of choosing Rickson Gracie. But to Rorion, he wanted to prove to the world that with jiu-jitsu, size does not matter.

The stage was set and the first Ultimate Fighting Challenge was ready. McNichols Sports Arena based in Denver, Colorado served as the venue for the match. While only 2,800 fans showed up for the match, it was a huge success. The pay-per-views for that first edition earned them more than double of what they had projected. Within just 2 to 3 pay-per-views, UFC was named as one of the most successful pay-per-views in franchise history by Forbes.

Rorion Gracie, later on, sold his company shares and left when he felt like TV had changed the philosophy of his tournament. The good thing is that he had accomplished his one and only goal of introducing jiu-jitsu to the world.
Today, the Ultimate Fighting Challenge has evolved greatly. The hybrid fighters have to be equipped with various skills so as to compete in the regulated environment and at an elite level. Karate, boxing, grappling, wrestling, sumo, kickboxing, and other martial arts and combat sports skills are required in the sport.

The company has conquered the world and made UFC a show watched and loved by many. The company produces over 40 annual live events that broadcast in more than 129 countries in the world, in about 800 million TV households and in 28 different languages.

MMA News

The Last of Al Iaquinta?

There is much going on in the UCF universe. One of the latest developments is that of Al Iaquinta. Al Iaquinta is one of the most durable fighters in UCF. On Saturday 23rd April 2016, he managed to take down Diego Sanchez in the night’s co-main event in just 98 seconds. He has been on a winning streak in the recent days recording five consecutive wins. His next stop will most likely be against one of the top contenders, and he is very close to a shot at the championship.

Well, that is just one side of the picture; basing on the recent developments. The other side is the narrative that speaks of a UFC future without this incredible athlete. With his real-estate career blooming on the Long Island, he is not quite certain about his fighting career.

According to a statement, he made to the media, he states that the money he earns is not worth if compared to the energy and what he goes through to ensure he wins. He went ahead to state that he has lost many years without making money.

Last year, Iaquinta announced his retirement and only appeared just recently. Basing on the statement he made, he just might not be coming back; at least not under his current contract. He argues that in as much as he loves to get into the arena and fight, the money he earns is not worth it given the high injury risk the fighters are exposed to when they fight.

What seemed to be the last nail in the coffin was his tweet on learning that he was not getting the $50000 post-fight performance bonus. Saturday might just have been the last time Iaquinta graces the UFC stage with a fight.

Frank Mir Statement on two-year suspension after testing positive for DHCMT

USADA on Friday announced Mir’s two-year suspension after he tested positive for Dehydrochloromethyltestosterone (DHCMT) – a banned “anabolic agent category” drug. Earlier on the 5th of February 2016, Mir had passed the test. However, USADA states that as per a new testing method they had been adopted, he actually tested positive.

In a post he wrote on his Facebook page, he expressed his frustration on the news of the positive test. He stated that it was already hard enough for him to try to analyze everything he had consumed in the period of just six weeks retrospectively and still denied knowingly consuming any substance that would violate the guidelines put in place by USADA.

Now at age 37, Mir will have to sit out until April of 2018 when he will be eligible to return to the ring for competition. As per his previous moves, it can almost be said with certainty that Mir will not be appearing in the ring in future. He has, in the past, requested that UFC releases him and has pursued various broadcasting gigs in the last few months.

Aljamain Sterling Actually thought of retirement had he lost to Augusto

Aljamain was almost certain he was going to have the upper hand over Augusto Mendes. While he was almost certain, he had some doubt lingering in his head thanks to the happenings of his two previous fights. He stated on Monday’s MMA Hour that he thought of sucking it up and sticking to real estate had he lost. With no win since the 10th of December, this anonymous nod from the judges was a great boost to Aljamain. He stated he actually felt good to be back and “…showing I belong on the top of the heap.”

Sterling is looking to gain momentum in the coming days and has expressed the desire to take part in the International Fight Week scheduled for July in Las Vegas. As for now, he can as well celebrate his triumph. He says he did what he said he would do, and that actually paid off. He might as well celebrate as he looks forward to more wins in the coming matches.

Mixed Martial Arts Fighting

The main event of the UFC fight night saw Cub Swanson take on Artem Lobov in the featherweight main event grudge match. Cub Swanson defeated Artem Lobov courtesy of an anonymous decision (49-46 x2, 50-45).

The co-main event involved Al Iaquinta squaring off with the popular veteran Diego Sanchez. It was a lightweight contest that saw Al Iaquinta clinch the win after serving Diego Sanchez a knockout. The match only lasted for one minute and 38 seconds (98 seconds).

In other results, Ovince Saint Preux beat Marcos Rogerio de Lima after he forced him into a submission upon unleashing the deadly von flue chock on him in round two. Eddie Wineland, also, fell on the list of the defeated fighters after a unanimous decision favored his opponent John Dodson (29-28, 30×27 x2). Stevie Ray and Mike Perry were the other two to complete the list of winners on the Main card. They beat Joe Lauzon and Jake Ellenberger via a majority decision and a second-round knockout respectively.

In the Undercard, Thales Leites beat Sam Alvey via unanimous decision (30-27 x3), Brandon Moreno made Dustin Ortiz submit and Scott Holtzman, and Danielle Taylor both won against Michael McBride and Jessica Penne respectively via unanimous decision.

In the Undercard (UFC Fight Pass), Alexis Davis beat Cindy Dandois thanks to a unanimous decision (29-28 x3). Bryan Barberena beat Joe Proctor via a TKO in the first round, and Hector Sandoval delivered the TKO to Matt Schnell in the first round to clinch the win too.

Talking of Knockouts, Mike Perry was at it again. Jake Ellenberger was the unfortunate prey in the case falling victim to yet another grisly – perhaps the grisliest – elbow knockout. Mike Perry has now gained the title, ‘The Knockout Artist’ and has quickly entered into the 2017 “KO of the Year” conversation.

Mike is on an impressive and promising run losing only one of his last four matches. All the three matches he won have been via pretty incredible knockouts.

 

MMA Fighting

Mixed Martial Arts Fighting

The main event of the UFC fight night saw Cub Swanson take on Artem Lobov in the featherweight main event grudge match. Cub Swanson defeated Artem Lobov courtesy of an anonymous decision (49-46 x2, 50-45).

The co-main event involved Al Iaquinta squaring off with the popular veteran Diego Sanchez. It was a lightweight contest that saw Al Iaquinta clinch the win after serving Diego Sanchez a knockout. The match only lasted for one minute and 38 seconds (98 seconds).

In other results, Ovince Saint Preux beat Marcos Rogerio de Lima after he forced him into a submission upon unleashing the deadly von flue chock on him in round two. Eddie Wineland, also, fell on the list of the defeated fighters after a unanimous decision favored his opponent John Dodson (29-28, 30×27 x2). Stevie Ray and Mike Perry were the other two to complete the list of winners on the Main card. They beat Joe Lauzon and Jake Ellenberger via a majority decision and a second-round knockout respectively.

In the Undercard, Thales Leites beat Sam Alvey via unanimous decision (30-27 x3), Brandon Moreno made Dustin Ortiz submit and Scott Holtzman, and Danielle Taylor both won against Michael McBride and Jessica Penne respectively via unanimous decision.

In the Undercard (UFC Fight Pass), Alexis Davis beat Cindy Dandois thanks to a unanimous decision (29-28 x3). Bryan Barberena beat Joe Proctor via a TKO in the first round, and Hector Sandoval delivered the TKO to Matt Schnell in the first round to clinch the win too.

Talking of Knockouts, Mike Perry was at it again. Jake Ellenberger was the unfortunate prey in the case falling victim to yet another grisly – perhaps the grisliest – elbow knockout. Mike Perry has now gained the title, ‘The Knockout Artist’ and has quickly entered into the 2017 “KO of the Year” conversation.

Mike is on an impressive and promising run losing only one of his last four matches. All the three matches he won have been via pretty incredible knockouts.

MMA Gyms

Given the size of the company and the continued growth, the company has established hundreds of gyms for its fighters. The sport is vigorous and requires heavy training regularly. There are more than 500 fighters who have contracts with the UFC and thanks to these gyms, the disparities in their talents keep getting smaller every day.

The gyms are spread throughout different parts of the world. The UFC fighters are usually ranked and depending on their rank and the gym that train them, they earn the gym some points that determine the gym ranking.

The ranking system is such that a champion earns their gym 25 points. If a fighter is the number one contender for a title, they earn their gym 15 points. For the number two contender earns the gym 10 points. A decrease in ranking will consequently lead to a 1 point decrease until rank 10. As per July of 2015, the top 10 UFC gyms were as follows:

Instead of listing every single MMA Gym there is, this is a list of the top 10 mma gyms based on how many top 15 ranked UFC Fighters are currently being trained at the gym.  There are 160 fighters who train at over 80 different gyms at the top 15 rankings in the UFC 10 divisions.

The rankings are based on a system where a champion earns their gym a score of 25 points. A #1 contender is worth 15 points, a #2 contender is worth 10 points with a decrease in ranking equaling a decrease of 1 point until the ranking reaches #10. From there, rankings 11-15 are each worth 1 point. (updated July 2015):

 

Sources:
http://www.ufc.com/discover/ufc
http://www.mmafighting.com/2013/11/12/5043630/rorion-gracie-and-the-day-he-created-the-ufc
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed_martial_arts
http://ockickboxing.com/blog/mma/history-of-mma-mixed-martial-arts/
http://www.mmafighting.com
http://www.thesportster.com/mma/top-20-mma-camps-and-gyms/

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